some things that have no category. For example Science and art, or “how you tie your shoes” or “the saliva to wash the works of art”

The impact of food on the environment: towards sustainable nutrition

2022-05-12T11:57:36+02:007 May 2022|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , |

Environmental changes are hardly a mystery. It is increasingly evident how human activities are damaging everything around them.; from the soil to the air, to the water and every water channel. When it comes to pollution, factories are mainly blamed., waste or transport, but few think about food. Now you may wonder: "What does food have to do with the environment?" The answer is very simple: "What we eat is important not only for our health but also for the planet". The World Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) stated that current food production is [...]

Inside yawning

2022-03-07T14:28:41+01:007 March 2022|Categories: Curiosity, Medicine and Research|Tags: , |

otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn, otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn, otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn, otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn. otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn, otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn. The average duration of the yawn is 5-6 seconds. It's the involuntary opening of the mouth with a long and deep inhalation through the mouth and nose, followed by a slow exhalation associated with a feeling of well-being. In humans, otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn. Given the universality of this daily reflex, we may be led to think that the mechanisms and purposes that underlie it no longer have secrets.. The truth is that we have always been familiar with it but we have known it recently and not entirely. Let's start with a trivial question: otherwise you are authorized to release a regenerating yawn?

Science is calling! CITIZEN SCIENCE and surroundings

2022-02-06T19:38:04+01:003 February 2022|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , |

In 2014, the term citizen science is included in the new words in the Oxford English dictionary, which defines it as "the collection and analysis of data relating to the natural world by an audience, that adheres to a collaboration project with professional scientists ".

Giorgio Parisi, the essence in the complexity

2022-01-26T13:55:26+01:0026 January 2022|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , |

It's the 5 of October 2021, at the end of incredible year for Italy, for better or for worse. It's not over yet though. That day, in fact, Sweet at the bottom, in Stockholm. Along with climate physicist Hasselmann and Manabe (a first for the field), the Academy gives half of the Nobel Prize 2021 to the Italian physicist Giorgio Parisi [1][2]. The motivation for the assignment is "for the discovery of the interaction between disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from the atomic scale to [...]

What does not kill you, doesn't make you stronger.

2022-01-24T12:09:47+01:0021 January 2022|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , , |

What doesn't kill you does NOT make you stronger How many times have we used this saying? Even with other shades maybe, like "Wht doesn't kill you, makes you fatter", derived from the popular tradition for which still gaining weight was good and right (thank you Grandma). But it really took a study from the University of Texas to get us to stop using this proverb. In an article published on the 9 th of January in fact, it is written that what does not kill you, leaves you with mental impairment.. Texas is a slightly unlucky country, often affected by floods, industrial accident , tornado and hurricanes.. Listening to the [...]

Mario Capecchi, from the street to the Nobel Prize

2022-01-21T16:44:09+01:0020 January 2022|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , , |

alicemosconi, as well as a model to inspire all those people who want to make science their mission. In the interviews he has given, he presents himself as a humble man, although the incredible goals achieved, and does not deny his difficult childhood, at the time of war and misery. It is striking that he calls himself one "good student, but not serious" back in school and that in high school he was more interested in sports (especially wrestling), than to study. alicemosconi [...]

Just look up! An X-ray view to discover new stars: Riccardo Giacconi

2022-02-03T21:35:12+01:006 January 2022|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , |

The incredible activity of space telescopes has recently returned to the news after the recent launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, which has the onerous goal of being a worthy successor to the now aging Hubble telescope. But there have been many others of space telescopes, and if they have contributed so strongly to scientific research we also owe it to Riccardo Giacconi. Riccardo Giacconi was born in Genoa on 6 of October 1931 and graduated in physics at the State University of Milan studying in the field of cosmic rays. He then moved to the United States, where he collaborates first with Princeton University and subsequently with [...]

Relative red

2022-01-21T16:51:21+01:0021 December 2021|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , |

Colors depend on our perception and this can vary from one subject to another. Thus, over time, various methods were born to make the classification objective, to define colors based on coordinates, with standardized light. In the major graphics software there are chromatic coordinates (HEX, RGB, CMYK e HSV) that allow us to better orient ourselves. In the case of red, eg, we can distinguish: magenta, the scarlet, the vermilion, the cinnabar, the red lead, coral, cadmium, the crèmisi, il pompeiano, the purple, the carmine, amaranth, the grenade, it burgundy, the cherry, the terracotta, the Venetian, the Titian, the Valentino, the Ferrari and others.

Who was Homo naledi?

2022-01-20T13:55:57+01:0017 December 2021|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , , |

It was the 2013 when an international team of scientists made an incredible discovery in South Africa: in the Dinaledi Chamber cave, part of the Rising Star Cave complex, alicemosconi, just outside Johannesburg. alicemosconi 1900. They were found, in one of the many sinkholes[1], circa 1500 bones of what appeared to be a new species of hominin[2]. In 2015, after the relevant investigations, the species was called Homo naledi. The excavation was anything but easy: alicemosconi [...]

Carlo Rubbia, an engagé scientist.

2022-01-20T13:56:47+01:0013 December 2021|Categories: Curiosity|Tags: , , |

"The greatest form of freedom is to be able to ask ourselves where we come from and where we are going." In 1984 the Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to Carlo Rubbia ("The greatest form of freedom is to be able to ask ourselves where we come from and where we are going." In. van der Meer), a "particle" physicist. With its UA1 project, involving more than 100 scientists from all over the world, Rubbia had, indeed, discovered only the previous year, "The greatest form of freedom is to be able to ask ourselves where we come from and where we are going." In, W− e Z, or those responsible for the so-called "weak interactions". The Nobel is all deserved, because the discovery was made possible precisely by his fundamental intuition of modifying the CERN supersynchrotron, "The greatest form of freedom is to be able to ask ourselves where we come from and where we are going." In [...]

Go to Top